Fires and Stoves

Fires make tipi life unique… They provide a warm, dry atmosphere and cooking facilities within your shelter. While a stove will burn longer than your fire, it doesn’t have the same cozy atmosphere.
One solution is to use a small stove and have an open fire next to it. Another solution is to use a heater with glass doors.

Open Fires

Open Fires

Keep lighters, matches, and other flammables well away from the fire area. Avoid burning garbage. (Plastics produce toxic fumes.) Watch for sparks escaping from the fire.

Firewood

Firewood

Use dry wood. Deciduous (poplar and birch) is best. Avoid spruce and pine and other sparky woods. Keep a supply of dry wood in the tipi at all times.

Stoves

Keep your stovepipe SHORT. (smoke will go out smoke opening.) Stovepipe should NOT extend out of smoke opening. (It should be at least 3 feet from canvas.) The clearance codes for your stove or heater should be met. (I.e. The distance from flammable items.)

Tipi Safety

Tipi Safety

Remember,  The gear inside tipis contains far more flammable synthetics than in the past. Use caution with fires, as the toxic gases from burning synthetics are extremely harmful.

Tipi fire pits

Tipi fire pits

Scrape the earth inside your fire pit down to mineral soil. If your tipi site is temporary, remove the sod carefully with a shovel and set aside to replace when you leave. Take care in selecting the rocks for your fire ring. Round river granite and other rocks may explode as they heat up. Volcanic rock is best. Cement barbecue bricks that form a ring when joined together work well in a permanent site. Leave a space between your firepit and the platforms. A free-standing portable screen is useful.

Pipe in fresh air

Pipe in fresh air

Pipe in fresh air from outside to feed your fire.  A piece of steel pipe at least 1-1/2”  dia.(exhaust pipe from a muffler shop is ideal…. $20-$30.) It can be buried and should end in the fire pit.  This will not only reduce smoke in the tipi, it will also reduce draughts.